EVENTS & INSIGHTS / INSIGHT

What not to do when writing your CV, Part 3: Lead with a lame profile

by Shannon Houde

Does your CV profile say something like, “I’m a former project manager with excellent people skills and organisational abilities and a strong passion for sustainability. Having spent ten years in telecoms, I have a thorough knowledge of the sector, and am committed to using my experience to further the sustainability agenda?”

If it does, it’s time to hit delete.

A personal profile should contain four sentences, minimal jargon and zero pronouns. Follow my tips below for a concise, clear, communicative statement that tells the reader who you are, what you’ve done, and where you’re going.

DON'T MISS OUT
ON MORE FREE TIPS

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Sign up

First sentence:

  • Give yourself a descriptive title. The market is buying your work experience, so put that first. It can be aspirational. Say your title was “Events Planner,” and you organized events for CR conferences. Now you want to be in marketing and communications within a CR team. You can put in your profile “CR Marketing Associate,” because it does descriptively reflect what you’ve done, who you are and where you’re going next.
  • Next look at the total years of experience. So, “CR Marketing Associate with 5 years’ experience” doing what?
  • Then drill down on the issues. What is your knowledge of specific sustainability issues? Environmental? Community investment? Supply chain? Human rights? This brings us to: “CR Marketing Associate with 5 years’ experience communicating human rights and youth issues at a global level within the private sector.”

Second Sentence:

  • Define yourself with your skills. What are they? Can you match them up with the job description? Make sure that they’re relevant, you can back them up and they summarize what you’ve done. Don’t be tempted to include an “I,” and certainly never speak in the third person! Think like a headline writer: maximize the space with keywords, and forget about the rest. “Diverse skills in communications, event planning, and cause related marketing.”
  • Then zone in on the sector. Give me more info on what you know, who you know and what scale your old company was operating at. “Diverse skills in communications, event planning, and cause-related marketing for a global telecoms company.”

Third Sentence:

  • What’s your Unique Selling Point? Make it clear what sets you apart as a candidate for this job. Have you worked abroad? Speak languages? Recently graduated? Published articles? “MSc in Sustainable Marketing and fluent in French.”

Fourth Sentence:

  • Identify your objectives. Let your audience know where you’re going and make sure it matches where the hiring manager needs you to go. Make sure that you’re not saying “My objective is to gain skills and experience working for an exciting company,” i.e. “you the hiring manager are going to need to help me build skills.” That hiring manager is buying something from you! Not the other way around. So let them know in your objective what you’re going to be selling or leveraging to help them achieve their goals. So more like, “Objective is to leverage marketing and communications skills to help a XXX firm build a more robust internal and external engagement program”. (NB the XXX should refer specifically to the company, eg “a PR firm.”)

Adding all this up, we get a dynamic personal profile:

“CR Marketing Associate with 5 years’ experience communicating human rights and youth issues at a global level within the private sector. Diverse skills in communications, event planning, and cause-related marketing for global telecoms and retail companies. MSc in Sustainable Marketing and fluent in French. Objective is to leverage marketing and communications skills to help a leading PR firm communicate to stakeholders the impacts of its sustainability program.”

Compare the profile above with the profile below.

“I’m a former project manager with excellent people skills and organizational abilities and a strong passion for sustainability. Having spent ten years in telecoms, I have a thorough knowledge of the sector and am committed to using my experience to further the sustainability agenda. I am a fluent French speaker and recently completed a part-time MSc in Sustainable Marketing.”

Who would you hire?

For more tips on avoiding the most common CV and resume mistakes, check out Part 1 and Part 2 of this series. You can also feel free to contact me for some bespoke advice.

This article originally appeared on TriplePundit.

Photo by Ryan Hyde, via Flickr.

comments

You may also like...

Aligning philanthropic and corporate agendas

Alli O’Connell has had a jam-packed 12 months. In August 2020, after years spent working in international development and the nonprofit sector, she took the leap into a role at California tech company Autodesk’s charitable foundation. Only a few months into the role, her supervisor left, turning what should have been a six-month contract position into not just a permanent role, but a big promotion for O’Connell too. Now head of marketing and communications at the organization, she talks about

By Shannon Houde
Deloitte policy director on ESG reporting, curiosity and cultivating connections

Kyra Kaszynski didn’t have the most typical start to a career in sustainability. She co-founded a record company in the 1990s before taking on a multitude of roles and industries, everything from sales to marketing and innovation, many carried out in a 16-year stint at leading professional services organization Deloitte. DON’T MISS OUTON MORE FREE TIPS Sign Up For Our Newsletter Sign up Then four years ago, Kaszynski joined the public policy team at Deloitte Global, a role which has

By Shannon Houde
How mindfulness can help retrain your brain – and recharge your career

When was the last time you were present? Really present in the moment? I bet it’s been a while. I get it, it is much more difficult than it sounds. Life can be chaotic. Full of endless distractions and unfinished to-do lists. Who has the time to sit and simply enjoy the feeling of, say, fresh air on their face? Or sit and notice the bubble of contentment that comes with achieving a small goal or spending an evening with family and friends? There

By Shannon Houde
How to attract and retain younger talent

The rising generation is willing to take salary cuts in order to work with companies they believe in – here are three ways leaders can attract the next generation of business leaders. The younger generation has a whole different set of values to those that came before them.   DON’T MISS OUTON MORE FREE TIPS Sign Up For Our Newsletter Sign up Whereas career ambitions for Baby Boomers and Generation X revolved around pay, prestige and promotion up the ranks, for both Millennials and Generation

By Shannon Houde

NEED SOME SUPPORT?

Book a 30-minute trial session with Shannon

BOOK A TRIAL