EVENTS & INSIGHTS / INSIGHT

Ways to network like a hero

by Shannon Houde

Many people make friendly chitchat in everyday life, but develop a phobia of meeting new people when they find themselves in a professional situation. The mere thought of standing alone at an event surrounded by potential employers, clients or contacts has them breaking out in a cold sweat. They’ve forgotten that all networking is basically making new friends, and that it can be fun as well as strategic, although it takes practice.

If you’re looking to make a career move into sustainability, corporate responsibility or the green economy, in-person networking remains the best way to convert potential opportunities into real jobs. Events and conferences are a great opportunity to show off those talents face-to-face, so step away from the coffee table and give yourself a powerful edge by following my tips below:

1. Don’t defer

Think everyone in the room is smarter, more senior, better dressed than you? Then you’ll never have the courage to start a conversation. Banish the imaginary hierarchy in your head and place yourself on an equal footing with everyone else, equally deserving of respect, equally worth talking to. Stand with shoulders back and front of your body open to the room so that you are accessible and friendly looking while also looking confident.

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2. Empathise, don’t sympathise

There are other people in the room feeling just as awkward and uncomfortable as you are. Rather than feeling sorry for yourself, turn your attention outwards and look for someone just as lost as you to go and speak to. As Jeff Haden puts it, “Turn sympathy for yourself into empathy for another. Go rescue someone.”

3. Be prepared

Having a little background knowledge on the other companies and individuals attending can be worth its weight in gold, so do your research in advance. At the same time, it’s a good idea to prepare a 30-second elevator pitch that sums up your USP – unique selling points. A killer elevator pitch is concise, clear, confident, and ends with a question or request.

4. Ask great questions

This comes from being well informed with your research as in step three. If you already know something about the companies that are attending, you can confidently ask about the sustainability work they’re undertaking. For example, you could ask how that new initiative is working out? What are their key issues? How is the process working? How are they approaching stakeholder engagement? Just like in dating, when in doubt, ask the other person to tell you about themselves and their work.

5. Be comfortable with silence

Confident people aren’t fazed by gaps in the conversation so don’t let your nervousness overload the person you’re speaking to with a babbling monologue. Confidence is demonstrated as much in silence as in what you say. Better to pause and let the silence set in or allow it to be an opportunity to move on to someone else.

6. Follow up

A short ‘nice to meet you’ email in the days after a meeting isn’t just polite, it will remind key contacts of who you are, what you do, and what you have in common. Sounds simple? You’d be surprised how few people actually do this. Rather than just sending out a generic LinkedIn invitation, make a personal connection – because that’s what it’s all about – building a relationship.

7. Give to receive

Once you’ve made that new connection, networking doesn’t end there! All relationships are a two-way street, so think about what you can offer as well as what you can receive. Nurture your network by sharing articles, insights and ideas. That way, when you need a personal recommendation or an internal referral, you’re more likely to get a positive response.

For more insights on networking, career changes and making it in the competitive world of sustainability careers, contact me.

This post originally appeared on TriplePundit.com

Photo credit: andrewllyodgordon via Pixabay

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